Monday, February 16, 2009

Kefurungri and Nnemmemu

There was a man who had a knife that cut anything. The village every year competed for the best cutter. The winner will castrate his opponent. Bheyeiku won many competitions in the village and everyone sang his praise. He walked and drummed his chest in the market square where he nicknamed himself Kefurungri (meaning; never forgive). When he won, he castrated his opponent there and there.

He had won and castrated many men. On the day he was beating a gentleman: Ntiso, his son stood by and saw his father humiliated. For the next three years, nobody wanted to challenge him because he has castrated one quarter of the men who challenged him. Ntiso’s son: Nnememu made up his mind to avenge the humiliation of his father. Even a weak child will always seek revenge when the father is humiliated in front of him. Ntiso's son made a cutlass that could cut on both sides. Beware how you humiliate the weak; Jehovah Nissi; the Lord their fighter will avenge their loss.

He challenged the village hero. A day was set for the competition. People came from all corners of the village, including neighboring villages. The drums of the young men vibrated every corner of the village. The women with makandi gyrated them, and the young girls danced and shook their breasts. This was once a year event that you missed or you died.

Nnememu was present when his father lost; his cutlass quickly got blunted and so could not more cut until the champion quickly cut the log into two. He saw the blood from his father’s manhood spill to the floor. This time he was ready for his opponent. Those who win and castrate others should know that one day they will lose and will be castrated too.

The signal was given and they began to cut. They cut the first log, cut the second and cut the third. Usually by the third log, the opponent’s cutlass will dull, and  Kefurungri will cut the last log. This time around, they went to the sixth and on the seventh his cutlass could no more cut anything. Each time he hit the wood, his machete bounced back at him. At this time, Nnememu had turned the side of his cutlass and then began to cut as if it was his first log. To the surprise of everyone,  Kefurungri surrendered and laid with his back so he could be castrated. Nnememu has won and avenged the humiliating loss of his father’s manhood. Unlike Kefurungri, he decided to take only one of his testicles out just so he teaches him a lesson. When you win beware how you jubilate for everyone who enters a competition will one day lose.

Until then, treat even your opponents with kindness for you may need kindness too one day.

Prince & PA Hamilton Ayuk

“No matter how a rat becomes the house pet, if it is sleeping beside the bag of groundnuts, the owner may not have much sleep. ” (Hamilton Ayuk).
"If a goat runs from the owner’s leash, it will be tied by the council in a market square." Hamilton Ayuk).

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